Databases: Category Archive (Page 3)

Posts about database technologies

Tuesday, March 2, 2010
  Oracle SQL Developer 2.1 Debian Package

It had been a while since I had updated SQL Developer. It turns out that version 2.1 was released March 1st of this year. I've downloaded it and created a Debian package. It can be downloaded from the Bit Badger Solutions Linux Software Repository.

I've used it with Sun's Java 6 Update 18; I have not tested it with OpenJDK. If you have problems getting it to work, you may want to check the previous post on this topic.

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Wednesday, October 29, 2008
  Oracle SQL Developer Debian Package

Oracle SQL Developer is a Java-based tool that provides a graphical interface to a database. While it's main focus is Oracle (of course), it can be hooked up, via JDBC, to many other databases, such as MySQL, PostgreSQL, and SQL Server. It's similar to Toad, but is provided by Oracle at no cost.

Oracle provides SQL Developer in either an RPM, or a generic binary install. I like the ability to manage packages, but I've never had much luck at getting RPM to run on Ubuntu. I downloaded the RPM file, and, using alien, I converted the package to a .deb package (Debian package format) and installed it. It worked like a charm!

I haven't tested it with gcj, but using Sun's Java 6 update 7 from the Ubuntu repositories, it ran just fine. After you install the package, do a directory list on /usr/lib/jvm. You're looking for the Sun JDK - if it's installed, you'll have a symlink java-6-sun that points to java-6-sun-1.6.0.07. Once you've determined the location of the JDK, run “sqldeveloper” from the command line - the program will prompt you for the path to your JDK. Enter it (probably /usr/lib/jvm/java-6-sun) and you're good to go. (You have to install the package as root - but, for the rest of these steps, use your normal user, not root, as this puts settings in a .sqldeveloper directory off your home directory.) The package installs an icon in the “Programming” or “Development” group. Once you've told it where the JDK is, you can use this to launch it.

Download SQL Developer 1.5.1 Debian Package

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Wednesday, October 29, 2008
  Oracle SQL Developer Debian Package

Oracle SQL Developer is a Java-based tool that provides a graphical interface to a database. While it's main focus is Oracle (of course), it can be hooked up, via JDBC, to many other databases, such as MySQL, PostgreSQL, and SQL Server. It's similar to Toad, but is provided by Oracle at no cost.

Oracle provides SQL Developer in either an RPM, or a generic binary install. I like the ability to manage packages, but I've never had much luck at getting RPM to run on Ubuntu. I downloaded the RPM file, and, using alien, I converted the package to a .deb package (Debian package format) and installed it. It worked like a charm!

I haven't tested it with gcj, but using Sun's Java 6 update 7 from the Ubuntu repositories, it ran just fine. After you install the package, do a directory list on /usr/lib/jvm. You're looking for the Sun JDK - if it's installed, you'll have a symlink java-6-sun that points to java-6-sun-1.6.0.07. Once you've determined the location of the JDK, run “sqldeveloper” from the command line - the program will prompt you for the path to your JDK. Enter it (probably /usr/lib/jvm/java-6-sun) and you're good to go. (You have to install the package as root - but, for the rest of these steps, use your normal user, not root, as this puts settings in a .sqldeveloper directory off your home directory.) The package installs an icon in the “Programming” or “Development” group. Once you've told it where the JDK is, you can use this to launch it.

Download SQL Developer 1.5.1 Debian Package

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Wednesday, October 29, 2008
  Oracle SQL Developer Debian Package

Oracle SQL Developer is a Java-based tool that provides a graphical interface to a database. While it's main focus is Oracle (of course), it can be hooked up, via JDBC, to many other databases, such as MySQL, PostgreSQL, and SQL Server. It's similar to Toad, but is provided by Oracle at no cost.

Oracle provides SQL Developer in either an RPM, or a generic binary install. I like the ability to manage packages, but I've never had much luck at getting RPM to run on Ubuntu. I downloaded the RPM file, and, using alien, I converted the package to a .deb package (Debian package format) and installed it. It worked like a charm!

I haven't tested it with gcj, but using Sun's Java 6 update 7 from the Ubuntu repositories, it ran just fine. After you install the package, do a directory list on /usr/lib/jvm. You're looking for the Sun JDK - if it's installed, you'll have a symlink java-6-sun that points to java-6-sun-1.6.0.07. Once you've determined the location of the JDK, run “sqldeveloper” from the command line - the program will prompt you for the path to your JDK. Enter it (probably /usr/lib/jvm/java-6-sun) and you're good to go. (You have to install the package as root - but, for the rest of these steps, use your normal user, not root, as this puts settings in a .sqldeveloper directory off your home directory.) The package installs an icon in the “Programming” or “Development” group. Once you've told it where the JDK is, you can use this to launch it.

Download SQL Developer 1.5.1 Debian Package

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Wednesday, October 29, 2008
  Oracle SQL Developer Debian Package

Oracle SQL Developer is a Java-based tool that provides a graphical interface to a database. While it's main focus is Oracle (of course), it can be hooked up, via JDBC, to many other databases, such as MySQL, PostgreSQL, and SQL Server. It's similar to Toad, but is provided by Oracle at no cost.

Oracle provides SQL Developer in either an RPM, or a generic binary install. I like the ability to manage packages, but I've never had much luck at getting RPM to run on Ubuntu. I downloaded the RPM file, and, using alien, I converted the package to a .deb package (Debian package format) and installed it. It worked like a charm!

I haven't tested it with gcj, but using Sun's Java 6 update 7 from the Ubuntu repositories, it ran just fine. After you install the package, do a directory list on /usr/lib/jvm. You're looking for the Sun JDK - if it's installed, you'll have a symlink java-6-sun that points to java-6-sun-1.6.0.07. Once you've determined the location of the JDK, run “sqldeveloper” from the command line - the program will prompt you for the path to your JDK. Enter it (probably /usr/lib/jvm/java-6-sun) and you're good to go. (You have to install the package as root - but, for the rest of these steps, use your normal user, not root, as this puts settings in a .sqldeveloper directory off your home directory.) The package installs an icon in the “Programming” or “Development” group. Once you've told it where the JDK is, you can use this to launch it.

Download SQL Developer 1.5.1 Debian Package

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Friday, March 28, 2008
  A Handy PHP Backup Script

I found a script over on the Lunarpages Forums about using PHP to back up your site. I have taken it, modified it a little, beefed up the documentation a lot, and am now posting it here. You can copy and paste it from below to customize it for your own use.

<?php
/**
 * Generic Backup Script.
 *
 * To configure this script for your purposes, just edit the parameters below.
 * Once you have the parameters set properly, when the script executes, it will
 * create an archive file, gzip it, and e-mail it to the address specified.  It
 * can be executed through cron with the command
 *
 * php -q [name of script]
 *
 * You are free to use this, modify it, copy it, etc.  However, neither DJS
 * Consulting nor Daniel J. Summers assume any responsibility for good or bad
 * things that happen when modifications of this script are run.
 *
 * @author Daniel J. Summers <daniel@djs-consulting.com>
 */

// --- SCRIPT PARAMETERS ---

/*  -- File Name --
	This is the name of the file that you're backing up, and should contain no
	slashes.  For example, if you're backing up a database, this might look
	something like...
$sFilename = "backup-my_database_name-" . date("Y-m-d") . ".sql"; */
$sFilename = "backup-[whatever-it-is]-" . date("Y-m-d") . ".[extension]";

/*  -- E-mail Address --
	This is the e-mail address to which the message will be sent. */
$sEmailAddress = "[your e-mail address]";

/*  -- E-mail Subject --
	This is the subject that will be on the e-mail you receive. */
$sEmailSubject = "[something meaningful]";

/*  -- E-mail Message --
	This is the text of the message that will be sent. */
$sMessage = "Compressed database backup file $sFilename.gz attached.";

/*  -- Backup Command --
	This is the command that does the work.

  A note on the database commands - your setup likely requires a password
	for these commands, and they each allow you to pass a password on the
	command line.  However, this is very insecure, as anyone who runs "ps" can
	see your password!  For MySQL, you can create a ~/.my.cnf file - it is
	detailed at //dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/4.1/en/password-security.html .
	For PostgreSQL, the file is ~/.pgpass, and it is detailed at
	//www.postgresql.org/docs/8.0/interactive/libpq-pgpass.html .  Both of
	these files should be chmod-ded to 600, so that they can only be viewed by
	you, the creator.

  That being said, some common commands are...

  - Backing Up a MySQL Database
$sBackupCommand = "mysqldump -u [user_name] [db_name] > $sFilename";

  - Backing Up a PostgreSQL Database
$sBackupCommand = "pg_dump [db_name] -h localhost -U [user_name] -d -O > $sFilename";

  - Backing Up a set of files (tar and gzip)
$sBackupCommand = "tar cvf $sFilename [directory]

  Whatever command you use, this script appends .gz to the filename after the command is executed.  */
$sBackupCommand = "[a backup command]";

// --- END OF SCRIPT PARAMETERS ---
//
// Edit below at your own risk.  :)

// Do the backup.
$sResult = passthru($sBackupCommand . "; gzip $sFilename");
$sFilename .= ".gz";

// Create the message.
$sMessage = "Compressed database backup file $sFilename attached.";
$sMimeBoundary = "<<<:" . md5(time());
$sData = chunk_split(base64_encode(implode("", file($sFilename))));

$sHeaders = "From: $sEmailAddress\r\n"
		. "MIME-Version: 1.0\r\n"
		. "Content-type: multipart/mixed;\r\n"
		. " boundary=\"$sMimeBoundary\"\r\n";

$sContent = "This is a multi-part message in MIME format.\r\n\r\n"
		. "--$sMimeBoundary\r\n"
		. "Content-Type: text/plain; charset=\"iso-8859-1\"\r\n"
		. "Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit\r\n\r\n"
		. $sMessage."\r\n"
		. "--$sMimeBoundary\r\n"
		. "Content-Disposition: attachment;\r\n"
		. "Content-Type: Application/Octet-Stream; name=\"$sFilename\"\r\n"
		. "Content-Transfer-Encoding: base64\r\n\r\n"
		. $sData."\r\n"
		. "--$sMimeBoundary\r\n";

// Send the message.
mail($sEmailAddress, $sEmailSubject, $sContent, $sHeaders);

// Delete the file - we don't need it any more.
unlink($sFilename);
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